Are you a workaholic?Are you a workaholic?

The dictionary defines a workaholic as someone who compulsively works hard and puts in long hours. While this alone isn’t necessarily a bad thing, the problem develops when it becomes habitual.

It’s fair to say I used to be a workaholic.

A few things changed that for me: my health, life events, and relocating to Indiana when my husband got a new job.

When I was forced to slow down and work differently, it felt like I wasn’t doing enough. What I found, however, was that I was able to get the same amount of work done in less time when I stopped overdoing it consistently. It was a real eye-opener, as well as a much needed change of pace and focus for my personal and professional well-being.

I know a lot of assistants who fall into the workaholic category.

Sometimes it’s touted as a badge of honor, but it’s not necessarily a positive trait. While it’s good to be engaged and excited about your job, working too much can lead to high stress, poor performance, and eventual burnout.

This week, our Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn pages have lots of information on workaholism, what it means, and how to recover from it. And our feature article talks about the difference between working hard and being a workaholic.

As admins, we sometimes think we have to do it all – that we have to be “on” 24/7. But, by occasionally taking a step back and allowing ourselves to recharge, we’re in a better position to support our executives and advance our careers!

Supporting your administrative success,

Julie Perrine

P.S. Is your mind at the office even when you’re at home? Do you need some strategies for a better work-life balance? We can help – but this session is only available through November 30. Get your free preview now!