email hackedDid you know that most hackers successfully enter into a company’s computer system through one of its employees? It might be a phishing link, a phone call asking for information, or even a combination of these tactics. Because of this, it’s crucial to your success and your company’s security that you know how to spot these potential intrusions.

Cybersecurity is not just the I.T. department’s responsibility. It’s your responsibility, too!

This week, our focus is on phishing scams. A phishing scam occurs when a hacker poses as a reputable company or person in electronic communications. This is one of the most popular ways that people steal data and gain entry into computer networks.

It may be an email attachment that looks like it’s from your executive, or the chief financial officer asking you to process an invoice, but the link under the text is anything but legit. And once you click on the link, you’re giving the hackers information that helps them further penetrate your company’s data security.

Many times, there are clues in the email that can warn you that it’s a scam, such as a different spelling of the sender’s name or a slightly altered domain name in the email. Typos, poor grammar, and requests to send private information are also huge red flags.

This week, we’re explaining some common phishing attempts and giving you tips on how to avoid them, as well as sharing more cybersecurity information on our Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn pages!

Supporting your administrative success,

Julie

P.S. If you haven’t checked out October’s AdminPro Training Series, I encourage you to do so! The topic is cybersecurity, and it’s packed full of actionable tips, resources, and best practices to keep you, your executive, and your organization safe. Learn more and register here!